The Commons is a weblog for concerned citizens of southeast Iowa and their friends around the world. It was created to encourage grassroots networking and to share information and ideas which have either been suppressed or drowned out in the mainstream media.

"But if the cause be not good, the king himself hath a heavy reckoning to make, when all those legs and arms and heads, chopped off in battle, shall join together at the latter day and cry all 'We died at such a place;' some swearing, some crying for a surgeon, some upon their wives left poor behind them, some upon the debts they owe, some upon their children rawly left. I am afeard there are few die well that die in a battle; for how can they charitably dispose of any thing, when blood is their argument? Now, if these men do not die well, it will be a black matter for the king that led them to it; whom to disobey were against all proportion of subjection." (Henry V, Act V, Scene 4)

Wednesday, August 17, 2005

Digby: Birth of the Anti-Military Right

From Digby's Hullaballo blog:

I've been thinking for a while that we might be seeing the beginning of a new trend in American politics --- the anti-military right. Rush is calling marines "pukes," veterans are being called cowards and fakers, disabled vets are mocked for not having the right wounds or getting them in the right way, GOP hags are wearing cute little "purple heart" bandaids on their cheeks. People are selling busts of the president using his lack of combat experience as a selling point saying outright that physical courage is no longer particularly worthy of conservative approbation. Being a veteran buys you no credibility and no respect in today's Real Murika.

This is how they transform Chickenhawkery into a badge of courage.

I suspect that what we are hearing (aside from the self-loathing fidgeting of those who loudly beat wardrums yet are too selfish to serve) is the distant rumblings of a massive rightwing frustration with the military's inability to just "win" this damned thing so we can move on to our next country. It was supposed to be a cakewalk..

[Digby cites this guy as an example--it was a rightwing comment on Andrew Sullivan's blog. Be prepared to vomit]:

I know this isn't going to popular on this website, but may I just point something out?

A soldier's #1 job is to stay alive. If you die, you can't accomplish the mission, and you weaken your team and put your buddies in danger.Obviously Sheehan's son, I forget his name at the moment, didn't die on purpose, and he may well have have had no control over the circumstances that let to his death. BUT. In war, there are no excuses. You find a way to stay alive.. if you're a good soldier. Sheehan's son didn't do that... he also failed the mission and let down his buddies... As a soldier, he was a failure. He was brave (maybe), but he was also incompetent.

So, really, how much exactly are we supposed to grieve over this guy? Isn't a certain amount of disapproval in order for the guy -- and by extension his mom, for making such a fuss over a person who was, in the last analysis, by definition a loser?

http://digbysblog.blogspot.com/2005_08_07_digbysblog_archive.html#112397669655412143

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